Wednesday, June 8, 2016

USA: Explaining Ramadan | Akram Khalid


Fasting is obligatory for adult Muslims, except those who are suffering from an illness, traveling, are elderly, pregnant, breastfeeding, diabetic or going through menstrual bleeding. Fasting runs from dawn until sunset.

Times of Ahmad | News Watch | US Desk
Source/Credit: Chambersburg Public Opinion
By Akram Khalid | June 7, 2016

Our President said, “I stand firmly with Muslim American communities in rejection of the voices that seek to divide us or limit our religious freedoms or civil rights.” Obama said. “I stand committed to safeguarding the civil rights of all Americans, no matter their religion or appearance.”

He added, “We will continue to welcome immigrants and refugees into our nation, including those who are Muslim.”

This is a policy of our current President and our founding fathers George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, James Monroe and, of course, Benjamin Franklin. These men, together with several other key players of their time, structured the American democracy and left a legacy that has shaped the America and the world.

I want to educate my fellow Americans about the holy month Ramadan, observed by Muslims worldwide as a month of fasting to commemorate the first revelation of the Quran to Muhammad, according to Islamic belief. This annual observance is regarded as one of the Five Pillars of Islam. The month lasts 29–30 days, based on the visual sightings of the crescent moon.

Fasting is obligatory for adult Muslims, except those who are suffering from an illness, traveling, are elderly, pregnant, breastfeeding, diabetic or going through menstrual bleeding. Fasting runs from dawn until sunset.

Muslims refrain from consuming food, drinking liquids, smoking, and engaging in sexual relations. Muslims are also instructed to refrain from sinful behavior that may reduce the reward of fasting, such as false speech (insulting, backbiting, cursing, lying etc.) and fighting.

Food and drink are served daily before dawn and after sunset. Spiritual rewards for fasting are to be increased or multiplied within the month of Ramadan. Fasting for Muslims during Ramadan typically includes offering of prayers and recitation and reading of the Quran.

What is main purpose of fasting? It is for the pleasure of God Almighty.

Fasting creates a sense of how hard it is to live without food and water, which encourages feeding the poor and needy. Muslims do more charity during this month and spend more time in remembrance of the creator, and do more prayers, especially at night. Fasting also helps every Muslim with self-control, righteousness, personal reformation and tolerance.

Muslims are not allowed to harm anyone in the month of Ramadan - that means that despite talking as offensively as you wish to any Muslim, you will be shocked to know that we Muslims say only good things in this month and ignore all bad talk.  In response you will get love and peace only - love for all, hatred for none.

Does it seem as though ISIS or the Taliban contradict these basic facts in the holy month of Ramadan?  Why? Because they are not true Muslims?

Akram Khalid , Chambersburg


Read original post here: USA: Explaining Ramadan | Akram Khalid


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