Monday, April 3, 2017

Myanmar: Ahmadiyyas Organize First Religious Founders’ Day in Yangon


“We are honoured to have this opportunity to being people of different faiths together to promote peace and solidarity. We hope the members of the audience can help spread messages of peace and solidarity to their communities”

Times of Ahmad | News Watch | US Desk
Source/Credit: Myanmar Times
By Tin Yadanar Tun | April 3, 2017

Myanmar celebrated its first Religious Founders’ Day on April 2, with the event organiser Ahmadiyya Muslim Community-Myanmar hoping to promote mutual love and understanding among peoples of different faith.

U Zeyar Moe, the spokesperson for the organisation, said they hoped the event would “present to all the essence and dignities of the founders of the different religions, and show their true teachings”.

“We hope this can help build peace, harmony, love and mutual respect around the world, and to promote greater understanding in comparative religious studies,” he said at the event at the Myanmar Medical Association’s Hall in Yangon.

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community had organised the event in over 200 countries, and only this year the event was held for the first time in Myanmar.

The event saw scholars from the major religions – Buddhism, Hinduism, Christianity and Baha’i – discussing their respective religions and teachings for three hours before an audience of some 650.

U Zeyar Moe said all religion founders preached peace and kindness, and people regardless of their faiths should respect each other and stand united for the betterment of their countries and wellbeing of all communities.

“We are honoured to have this opportunity to being people of different faiths together to promote peace and solidarity.

“We hope the members of the audience can help spread messages of peace and solidarity to their communities,” U Zeyar Moe said.

National League for Democracy (NLD) patron Thura U Tin Oo, who also addressed the audience at the event, spoke about peace and Islam.

He said as taught in Buddhism, anyone could be won over with only ‘Myitta’, without anger.

“The Holy Quran says mosques are homes of peace. They are where the true teachings of Prophet Muhammad are taught. A real Muslim is honest and will serve his neighbours well.

“We need to discuss more about the different faiths and their founders, as all religions preach love. We need to hold more events like this,” he said.

Hindu scholar Sayardaw Ashin Yama Sandradas said mutual respect among the different faiths was important for peace and solidarity, while Buddhist scholar Ashin Thumana said people should treat each other well, even if they had different religions.

“We should be hospitable to everyone, even if they have a different belief.

“Historically, all Burmese kings have given their people freedom of religion, none were forced to profess any religion against their will. They were also allowed to convert,” he said during the talks.

Dr Moris Nyunt Wai said people who could not find peace within themselves would not find peace in the world, citing Buddhist teachings.

Stressing that people would attain peace if they rid their anger, he said even Jesus Christ had said one should love one’s enemy and pray for the sadist.

“The Prophet Muhammad also said keeping peace with another is better than praying and fasting.

“The wisdoms of the founders of religion are like beacons. If we do as our religions teach us, the world can have peace.
“We just need to talk more about love, than war,” he said

Baha’i scholar U Shwe Thee reminded the audience that every religion in the world preached peace.

Central Interfaith Friendship Committee secretary-general and YMCA chairman Dr U Thar Nyan, said Myanmar needed interfaith events nationwide to help ease conflicts.

Hindu Women Association chair Daw Kathaleen Thein said every township needed to have interfaith events that could educate the people on peace, unity and understanding among the different religions.

“We need these events so all the hate speeches can fade away, and the people can build harmony within our diverse societies around the country,” she said.

She added that interfaith events should also include minority religions and atheists to be more inclusive.


Read original post here: Myanmar: Religious Founders’ Day observed for the first time in Yangon


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