Sunday, March 11, 2018

Pakistan court ruling against Ahmadiyya minority draws criticism


Zohra Yusuf, a board member at the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan, on Sunday called the ruling "very dangerous." She said her group would issue a statement in the coming days.

Times of Ahmad | News Watch | UK Desk
Source/Credit: Fox News
By Associated Press | March 10, 2018

ISLAMABAD –  Rights activists in Pakistan are expressing concern over a court ruling that would require people to declare their religion on all official documents, saying it could lead to the persecution of minorities, particularly adherents of the Ahmadi faith.

The Islamabad High Court ruling on Friday also requires that citizens take a religious oath upon joining the civil service, armed forces or judiciary.

Zohra Yusuf, a board member at the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan, on Sunday called the ruling "very dangerous." She said her group would issue a statement in the coming days.

The ruling appeared to be aimed at Ahmadis, who revere the 19th century founder of their faith as a prophet. Pakistan declared Ahmadis non-Muslims in 1974. They already face widespread discrimination and are often targeted by extremists.


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2 comments:

  1. General Zia,s legacy continues to haunt Nation,s psyche as evident from Islamabad high court,s latest (funny) verdict.

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  2. Values and justice are in such a state of flux in Pakistan that it's hard, even silly, to expect anything sensible to come out of that country. The trouble is, the mullah has had people convinced that appearing in support of "Khatm-e-Nabuwwat, will get them in good stead with the mullah and that means easy life in Pakistan and the assurance that the supporters of Khatm-e-Nabuwwat will go to paradise. So, people vie with each other to do harm to the "biggest enemies" of Khatm-e-Nabuwwat, the Ahmadis. How have the Ahmadis earned the title? They believe that God Almighty can appoint a prophet whenever He wants and whoever He wants and this goes against the common belief that that God Almighty has, God forbid, cut His hands and stopped speaking after revealing the Quran to Prophet. But, considering that Shias believe that Ali truly deserved the prophet-hood that Muhammad got and various other beliefs among official Muslims that shred the Khatme-Nabuwwat to pieces, believing that there could be another prophet following Prophet Muhammad cannot be too big a sin. So, why must the Ahmadis be "eradicated"? Unhinged though it is, the latest ruling from the Islamabad High court, gives the true reason why the mullahs and all the official Muslims think Ahmadis must be "eradicated", they are still eating, not just eating, they are quite well to do and, by spreading the understanding of the Quran, they are increasing their numbers too! So, all remaining doors should be closed to them. Now the question is how low can a Pakistani judge get? How low can Pakistan get?

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